Dr. Brian Todd was a postdoctoral fellow in the Hopkins Lab in 2008-2009. He worked closely with PhD student Christine Bergeron and others to study the effects of mercury contamination on amphibians along the South River in northern Virginia. His work with colleagues here resulted in the completion of several studies that increase our understanding of the physiological and ecological consequences of mercury contamination.

Brian is now an Assistant Professor at UC Davis in their Department of Wildlife, Fish, and Conservation Biology. Work in his lab primarily focuses on the ecology and conservation of reptiles and amphibians. He is interested in understanding the factors that affect the distribution, abundance, and persistence of wildlife populations.

According to Brian,  “we conduct research with the goal of answering questions about the ways in which wildlife respond to a world that is rapidly changing due to anthropogenic factors like habitat loss or degradation, climate change, and the introduction of invasive species or novel pathogens.”

Visit Brian at his new home at UC Davis   

brian_todd

Representative Publications

Nowakowski AJ, Watling JI, Whitfield SM, Todd BD, Kurz DJ, Donnelly MA. In Press. Tropical amphibians in shifting thermal landscapes under land use and climate change. Conservation Biology, forthcoming.

Eskew EA, Todd BD. 2013. Parallels in amphibian and bat declines from pathogenic fungi. Emerging Infectious Diseases 19(3):379-385.

Willson JD, Hopkins WA, Bergeron CM, Todd BD. 2012. Making leaps in amphibian ecotoxicology: translating individual-level effects of contaminants to population viability. Ecological Applications 22(6): 1791-1802.

Todd BD, Scott DE, Pechmann JHK, Gibbons JW. 2011. Climate change correlates with rapid delays and advancements in reproductive timing in an amphibian community. Proceedings of the Royal Society B 278:2191-2197.

Semlitsch, R.D., B.D. Todd, et al. 2009. Effects of timber management on amphibian populations: understanding mechanisms from forest experiments. BioScience 59(10):853‐862.

Todd, B.D., T.M. Luhring, B.B. Rothermel, and J.W. Gibbons. 2009. Effects of forest removal on amphibian migrations: implications for habitat and landscape connectivity. Journal of Applied Ecology 46:554‐561.

Tuberville, T.D., T.M. Norton, B.D. Todd, and J.S. Spratt. 2008. Long‐term apparent survival of translocated gopher tortoises: a comparison of newly released animals and previously established residents. Biological Conservation 141:2690‐2697.